How come girls from the countryside are more open about sex?

| February 20th, 2010

This short article (from Tianya) was written by a student from the countryside. It has no statistics, nor is it necessarily anthropological, but it is an honest testimony from personal experience, which in my opinion, is sometimes more valuable than quasi-objective statistical conclusions.

It starts out:

I, myself, am a person from the countryside。 I’m not writing this to be discriminatory, I just hope it leads to reflection, and maybe to finding the source of the problem.

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How to be a real man, according to some Chinese guy

| February 17th, 2010

This is a slightly older post on Mop (from October 2009) but it has gotten over 20,000 comments (and a lot of support) and somehow it has reached the top of the charts again. It seems to reflect a lot of the mainstream sentiment of how to be a 爷们. I guess it would translate to something like “manly man,” or “real man,” but it should be interpreted in a Chinese context. Personally, I see it as a modern and […]Read more…

Three goals! Men’s soccer! Yes, men’s soccer! What? Yes! They beat Korea!

| February 10th, 2010

The title is a phone conversation overheard in the streets after the China-Korea men’s soccer match. Not for 32 years has China beat Korea in a men’s soccer match. So when China beat Korea 3-0, Chinese soccer fans essentially went crazy with media saying it is a win of “historical importance.” The win has also wiped out the continued talk of “Koreanphobia” within the men’s soccer team, due to 27 consecutive non-wins in the past 32 years.

Having battled with problems […]Read more…

Presenting Atm-Art: Chinese artists and photorealism of China

| February 5th, 2010

Tiananmen

Michael Van Den Heuvel is Dutch and Thor Selander is Danish, and they are combining elements of painting and sculpture to depict China – especially China’s present in contrast to its future, and Chinese artists from angles that are not traditionally examined. They wrote to ChinaHush looking for a platform to expose their art to a greater audience. We found their artwork to be engaging and confrontational, truthful and personal. Also, we thought that the sporadic nature of […]Read more…

Transparency and corruption – two sides of the same coin?

| January 24th, 2010

“The most expensive website in history” is the infamous name for the new Confucius Institute website, a name dubbed by the Chinese media and public. The Ministry of Finance recently announced the cost of the new Confucius Institutes website (here) and the new China Trade Union website. It seems to be the general consensus among the netizens that 35,200,000 RMB and 6,700,000 RMB are absolutely ridiculous amounts to be paying for a single website. A Chinese netizen, DASH, who […]Read more…

A step toward democracy: The case of Guangzhou

| January 4th, 2010

 “It’s not even a tad democratic”

This article (from Netease) got me really excited because I have always been interested in China’s democratization efforts. I previously translated a post on “How should we live before democracy?” As somewhat of a follow-up, this article will explain the changes happening in Guangzhou while also discussing how the Chinese government actually interprets democracy, which is something I’ve not seen discussed in most blogs about China (some of this is from my own blog). […]Read more…

An elderly woman who collects scraps returns lost 7000 RMB to police

| December 22nd, 2009

I was feeling pretty disappointed with humanity after the results at Copenhagen, but then I read this story and felt a bit uplifted. If everyone was this selfless and took only what they needed, I imagine a different result at Copenhagen would have been possible. In less than one day, this story has generated 1200 comments on Mop.

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“U.S. threat theory” and how we talk about threats

| December 20th, 2009

For the past decade or so, there has been debate about the validity of the “China threat theory.” The above picture shows the presence of US military bases in relation to China in the region. My first reaction to this picture was: Is there talk of a “US threat theory” in China that I am not aware of? When I first saw this picture, I was very intrigued. In my studies of international relations, I have never heard the […]Read more…

The disaster of “Chimerica” – Can both sides be losers?

| December 14th, 2009

In early 2007, Niall Ferguson coined the term “Chimerica” to describe the economic relationship between the United States and China. At first, in 2007, Ferguson said Chimerica “seemed like a match made in heaven” – the Chinese did the lending, the Americans the borrowing. China and the US accounted for 40 percent of global growth from 1998 to 2007.

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Family Portraits of all 56 ethnic groups in China

| December 6th, 2009

[ChinaGate] This is a “Family Portrait” of China’s 56 ethnic groups. Chen Haiwen, a photographer, recently lead a team of 14 photographers to create a book entitled, “Harmonious China: A Sketch of China’s 56 Ethnicities.” The team spent one year travelling all over China to complete the project. They ended up taking over 5.7 million photographs.

Thanks Mike, Helena, and Diana!

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The struggle of the sexless class

| December 2nd, 2009

Hi everyone, I’ve already written a few posts for ChinaHush but I guess I should formally introduce myself. My name is CC and I’m currently studying philosophy at Peking University. I will graduate next spring from George Washington University. You can read more about me in the “About” section or e-mail me about anything at cc.huang2 at gmail dot com. Also – other places I am on the Internet: Chinamatic, Responsible China, Twitter, Tumblr.

"Dwelling Narrowness" (蜗居) (A Romance of House) […]Read more…

How should we live before democracy?

| November 29th, 2009

(Image: Guns N’ Roses’ “Chinese Democracy” album cover, released in November 2008)

When Chinese people write blog articles, their meaning is often subdued and slightly nuanced, they are less willing be to direct and straightforward. Or, even if it seems that they are being direct, they will have hidden meanings embedded in what they say. While some topics are just sensitive no matter what in China, democracy is one of those that might be sensitive or might not, depending on […]Read more…

The hottest people on the internet in China in 2009

| November 24th, 2009

Ever since the Internet has spread like wildfire in China, people have become famous through the Internet, sometimes unintentionally. In Chinese netizen-speak, this is known as being “red” (more of a reference to fire or vibrance than the usual Communist connotation) which can be translated as being “hot,” or maybe “the rage.” Now that 2009 is coming to an end (also the year where the number of Internet users in China has surpassed the US population), there are various tallies […]Read more…

China’s endless search for distinguished talent

| November 22nd, 2009

 

A new system

For most Chinese students, the most harrowing event of their lives is the dreaded gaokao, the exam that has omnipotent powers to determine where they go to college. Unlike college entrance in the U.S., which is determined by a combination of SAT scores, grades, activities, recommendations, China has used the gaokao system since 1977 and has not had drastic changes to the system since then.

Until recently.

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