Three farmers in Henan prosecuted for establishing their own government

| April 28th, 2014

image courtesy of chinatechnews.com

Three farmers with only primary school educations were arrested for establishing “New Dengzhou People’s Government,” a makeshift-governing agency located in Henan province on April 21.

Nicknamed the “Zhang Trio,” Zhang Xin, Maxiang Lan and Wang (no first name available) established “New Dengzhou People’s Government” in September 2013, after the old “Dengzhou People’s Government” withdrew from legitimacy that same month, according to news.dahe.cn.

The government printed their own seal, formed nine ministries and commissions, issued legal documents and recruited […]Read more…

Chinese official dies from drinking too much after first day on job

| April 23rd, 2014

photo courtesy of globalannal.wordpress.com

A Chinese official died from drinking too much — on his first day on the job.

Zhong Xiefei died from excessive drinking the evening of April 9, according to South China Morning Post. That Wednesday he enjoyed his first — and last — day of work as deputy chief of Laibin city, located in Guangxi province in south China.

Zhong began drinking baijiu, China’s national liquor, with other provincial and county-level officials that day at lunch.

That night, family […]Read more…

Chinese justice system reform: Abolishing reeducation through labor, Creating a legitimate court system, Chinese magazine reports

| March 3rd, 2014

Protests in Wukan. Photo from Southern Window article.

In December 2011, the citizens of Wukan, a village in Guangdong, staged an uprising, forcing the local government officials out of the village, in a protest over land sales of communal farm land. In the course of the protests, three democratically-elected village representatives had been arrested and one had died. But after the citizens took over their village, the governor of Guangdong, Wang Yang, did something notable: Instead of taking the village […]Read more…

Can China Create a “Small Government, Big Society”?

| February 3rd, 2013

The ushering in of China’s new President Xi Jinping later this year has caused a lot of discussion about what the future holds for China’s economic and political system. A string of recent issues have highlighted problems caused by corruption, rising inequity between cities and countryside, distrust of the government, and questions about how long 8-10% growth rates can continue. In 2011, in Wukan, Guangdong province, citizens revolted, kicking the local government out of town, over a disputed land deal. […]Read more…