Opinion Posts

My American journey

| December 13th, 2012
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When I was seven years old, my first impression of America was that it was a “Country of Chocolate.” The reason for that was that I was given an American Chocolate by one of my aunt’s friends who had just returned to China from the U.S. While the adults were talking about the country with such a strong interest, for me, the chocolate represented everything in the world. When I started the fourth grade, I began to learn [...]Read more…

Killing of Asian-American on subway prompts questions of racism on CNN, Weibo

| December 6th, 2012
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Does coverage of the murder of Korean-American immigrant Ki Suk Han, who was pushed onto the tracks of the New York subway on Monday, December 3 raise important racial issues?

One CNN guest and a number of commenters on Sina Weibo seem to think so.

On December 3, Naeem Davis, a black man, pushed Han onto the tracks after the two had become engaged in an argument. He was struck and killed less than a minute later. The incident became international news [...]Read more…

China’s “new Futures” – Chris Barrett’s photographic exhibition on China’s one-child policy

| November 30th, 2012
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Chris Barrett is a young British photographer, Master of photojournalism at the University of Westminster, Bachelor of Fine Arts at Nottingham Trent University. In the past he has undertaken photo projects in North Korea, Georgia, Iran and many other Asian countries. He has been working off and on in China for six years spending 2 years researching and shooting his ongoing photographic around the issue of “China’s one-child policy”. [new] Futures is an exhibition of something of this work which [...]Read more…

Han Deqiang and Patriotism

| October 15th, 2012
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Radical Maoist professor Han Deqiang has become the face of Diaoyu Islands extremists after he slapped an 80-year-old man at a protest in September. At a protest against Japan’s plan to nationalize the Diaoyu/Senkaku Islands, an elderly man took offense with some of the protesters’ pro-Mao slogans, and Han, a professor at Beijing Aeronautical Institute, slapped him on the face twice and accused him of being an anti-Chinese traitor.

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Are the Diaoyu protesters behaving rationally?

| September 12th, 2012
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Of mice and menace [By Jia Qiang/China.org.cn]

Have anti-Japanese sentiments gone too far in China in the wake of the intensification of the Diaoyu Islands controversy? Some Chinese writers think so. After Japanese activists landed on the islands to reassert Japanese ownership following Hong Kong activists’ landing, protests were sparked throughout China, and some protesters smashed Japanese cars.

Liu Wending, in a column that was published at China.org.cn, a website published by the State Council Information Office, wrote that “some [protesters] threatened [...]Read more…

The Boluo Fox

| August 28th, 2012
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The following is a special report written by C.S. Hagen

Introduction to the Cult of the Fox

Ask anyone in China about the fox and their instant reaction is either fear or pride. The fox in Asia is one of five demigods. To the Taoists the fox is a messenger of Buddha and not subject to human rule but rather the focus of respect and worship. To agnostics the furry, hen-thieving dog’s cousin is a symbol of fertility, [...]Read more…

Chinese girl witnesses Batman premiere shooting

| July 21st, 2012
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A 19-year-old Chinese American girl witnessed the Batman premiere shooting.  She wrote down her thoughts on guokr.com.  There is the translation:

Today, I went with my older sister, my cousin and my good friend to see the opening show of the new “Batman” movie.  Very happy we can to go together. My cousin, my older sister and my friend are all first time seeing a movie premiere.  We all went with a feeling that we couldn’t explain.  We could have escaped [...]Read more…

How much are multinational companies dependent on China?

| April 21st, 2012
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From Netease:

Report on Wednesday said, the ambitious Starbucks is continuously expanding in China, but customers staying in Starbucks not leaving is a major obstacle of expanding in China – “Customers love these shops too much, they sit there for hour after hour, and sometimes without buying any coffee at all.”  In fact, although these multinational companies have amazing rate of expanding in China, looking at the sales numbers comparing with total global sales, China is still relatively a small market, [...]Read more…

The Transformation of Yao Ming

| February 21st, 2012

This article originally appeared on Kun Kun’s blog. Written by Kun Kun Yu Translated by Cathy Song

 

Kun Kun Yu writes for Bloomberg Businessweek China and is the author of “Not Polite, Not Vulgar.” Her work has appeared in GQ China and Sanlian Life Week. She blogs at http://www.bullock.cn/blogs/catnapkun/

Last December I stood with Yao Ming on the balcony of the Roosevelt Hotel in Shanghai. Located on the seat of the Bund, we had a sweeping view of the city. Across from [...]Read more…

Han Han: My 2011

| January 10th, 2012
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From Han Han’s Sina Blog:

2011 went by a few days ago. Back when I was in school, I used to hate writing those year end reflections and self-appraisal essays. Year after year, apart from having nothing to wrap-up, I always felt it pointless to pour my guts out to some authority figure. Plus, I’d remember what I wanted to remember. Later, I discovered how unreliable memories can be and so nowadays I’m happy to record things through writing. As a [...]Read more…

Why South Koreans are entitled to rage upon the coast guard incident

| December 16th, 2011
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Starting from Dec 13rd, South Koreans groups have been protesting in front of China embassy for 3 consecutive days because of the death of a coast guard resulted by Chinese fisherman. While some media manipulates the incident as “rightful defense” of the accused fisherman and depicts South Koreans as narrow-minded and over-reacting ethnicity, the majority of mainstream media in China remain cool-headed and manages to present the in-and-out of the whole incident. Here is a good example from Netease who [...]Read more…

Why China doesn’t have its own Steve Jobs

| November 29th, 2011
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(The commentary by Qiulin 邱林, translated from caixin.cn)

As millions of Chinese netizens mourned over Steve Jobs’ death, they also raised a question – why couldn’t China produce its own “Steve Jobs”? Former vice-president of Google global and president of Google China Kai-fu Lee explained on his weibo that it was because Chinese education puts too much emphasis on reciting and memorizing stuff instead of fostering critical thinking. He pointed out that it wasn’t that Chinese people are not smart [...]Read more…

For Light, For Time

| October 31st, 2011
Guangcheng, the farthest distance in the world isn’t between life and death, but from the gate of the village to your house.

Cathy is a recent college graduate who tweets here. If you want something translated on ChinaHush, or give her a job, email her at xiaosongbird [at] gmail [dot] com.

On October 16th,  a group of five friends attempted to visit Chen Guangcheng, a Chinese activist who is currently under house arrest in Dong Shigu Village. This is the event that followed.    By Murong Xuecun  Translated by Cathy

One

On the evening of October 14th, I was [...]Read more…

The two extremes of Chinese characteristic physical education

| October 26th, 2011
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(From ifeng) Kids in China are forced to relate to sports in one way or another. Some of them maximize physical training so that they can count on sports to earn a living in the future, the rest has to minimize exercise intensity to focus on passing exams and getting into better schools. These two extreme attitudes towards sports constitute unique Chinese characteristic physical education.

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