Shanghai World Expo: Japan Pavilion not raising Japanese flag to give consideration to anti-Japanese sentiment in China

| May 9th, 2010

japan_pavilion_2010expo

This was originally from a Japanese blog, then soon translated to Chinese and reposted on many Chinese websites. So friends who speak Japanese please let us know any discrepancy on this indirect translation of the original text.

On the first day of Shanghai World Expo, national flags were flying in front of many counties’ pavilions, but the Japanese Pavilion said goodbye to their flag. The responsible person gave the explanation, “We had precedent cases that we do not raise our national flag at other prior World Expos”, “However taking this measure this time is to give consideration to the Chinese anti-Japanese sentiment” The Japanese Pavilion staff also said, “We are purposely preventing the things we show here from getting dragged into politics.”

Television programs with Sino-Japanese War themes are frequently broadcasted in China, many people think the sun flag is a symbol of militarism.

On the opening of the Japan Pavilion about 3,000 Chinese tourists formed into a long line to get in, it was quite a lively scene. Second year high school student (17 year old) Wu Zhaoyi from Wenzhou City, Zhejiang Province came to Shanghai on a bus the day before the opening, he said excitedly “I want to see high-tech stuff.” Shanghai local company employee (34 year old) Cao Mei also said, “the pavilion was too popular during the trail run, so I did not get a chance to see it. This time I must see it.”

At the same time, chairman of the North Korea Supreme People’s Assembly, Kim Yong Nam already arrived at North Korean Pavilion in the morning of May 1 before the opening. He was led by the guards and inspected the venue. When the reporter wanted to get closer to him, was stopped by the volunteer security guards and prevented from shooting any photos.

Next to the North Korean Pavilion is the Iranian Pavilion; both pavilions of the countries which are swinging back and forth on the nuclear issue are guarded by armed police, always on high alert.

There are thousands of comments on the original post, I will translate a few.

Why are we opening pavilion on the land that would not allow us to raise our flags, retard.

Is it a joke? If we cannot raise our flag then just go home.

Why do we have to consider their feelings?

At least raise a white flag

The Japanese are living so carefully?
Isn’t this discrimination?
Are there other countries like Japan?

People in China didn’t even say anything yet, and Japan acts on its own thinking thoroughly for others and put so many rules on itself. Really so touching and makes people cry, China didn’t say thank you?

“We are purposely preventing the things we show here from getting dragged into politics.” Stupid? If you don’t want to drag everything into politics, then the right thing to do is raising the Japanese flag.

Surely even the Chinese people cannot understand it. The main exhibition hall has all the countries’ flags clearly raised.

Although I am not Chinese, But the Chinese people would not think “Japan cares about our feelings.” They would think, “See! They really have shameful things, so they don’t dare to raise the sun flag.”

Consider this, show understanding for that, actually only Japanese people think so much. I think Chinese people are more straightforward then you imagine.

Chinese comments translated by Wang Er:

“是日本自己的问题.中国人没那么敏感.你们太小看中国民众的包容力和成熟度了”

It’s Japan’s own problem. Chinese people are not that sensitive. You underestimate Chinese people’s tolerance and maturity.

“其实这是对主办国的不尊重… ”

[Not raising the Japanese flag] is actually disrespectful to the host country.

“他们不升国旗,国内的工作人员都不来问的么?只有日本不升国旗确实很怪吧= = ”

They didn’t raise their flag but why Chinese staff didn’t ask them reason? Isn’t it strange that only Japan did such thing?”

“我一开始还以为日本忘记升旗了呢 = = ”

I thought Japan forgot raising its flag.

“我很费解”

I’m confused.

” 真怕反日的话,干嘛要建造日本馆?
反过来既然已经大张旗鼓的开放了,为啥还要做这么弱智的行为。。
话说回来,中国人压根也不会真的跑世博反日吧
日本人到底清不清楚咱们的反日底线和这个反日的出发点是啥?
大学生都跑去当志愿者了,哪有空去反日啊。。。 ”

If they are really afraid of anti-Japan sentiment, why build the Japanese Pavilion in the first place? Since they have already opened the Pavilion on a grand scale, then why did they do such silly thing [not raising national flag]? By the way, Chinese people wouldn’t go to the Expo to protest Japan. Japanese don’t get our baseline and origin in anti-Japanese sentiment. College students all went to become Expo volunteers so who has time to protest …

“韩国说自己场馆最受欢迎虽然比较蠢,但勉强还能接受…至于日本这个就……真是蠢翻了. ”

Korea said their Pavilion is the most popular, which is silly but could still be acceptable …. as for Japan’s [not raising flag] … is so stupid.

” 其实这并不关我们事啊,怎么拿我们开涮了 ”

This incident is not our business, so don’t make us involved.

“非常奇怪。扬日本国旗正常。这是国际展览会。有中国人反对的话,这是中国方面的问题。
可是我也了解,关于日本,什么事情会成为反日的借口的。
比如说,在中国的日本企业,午饭不那么好的话,就有中国人说,日本人瞧不起中国人,或因为日本的历史原因,日本企业对中国人的待遇特别好。
还有,在商业上的谈判,日本的东西贵的话或发现问题的话,中国方面就说日本人瞧不起中国,或提起历史问题或反日情绪,让日方受对不起的感觉,让日方让步。
我们经常听说过上面第二个故事。韩国也是一样。”

Very weird. Raising Japanese flag is normal since it’s an international exhibition. If any Chinese person is against it, it’s China’s problem. However, I understand what’s could be used as excuses to protest Japan. For example, if Japanese company’s China branch has lower standard in food in lunch, there would be Chinese people to say Japanese people look down upon us and they would further relate it to historical reasons, so Japanese companies in China treat Chinese employees pretty well. And more, if Japanese products have issues or are too expensive, some Chinese would use that part of history as a chip in bargaining and force the Japanese side to compromise. We heard the second story a lot. Korean are doing the same thing to Japan too.

” 军旗和国旗是两回事吧,无语升个国旗有什么问题的囧 ”

[Japan’s] army flag and it’s national flag are two different things, what’s the problem of raising the national flag? I’m speechless.

“世博跟政治无关,堂堂正正升起你们的国旗吧。
天朝去日本做什么自然也会骄傲的升起五星红旗,这是民族的荣耀。 ”

Expo should be unrelated to politics, so raise your flag proudly. We will do the same and raise our flag proudly when doing anything in Japan. This is about national prestige.

” “你们再不升国旗我们就要向这个所属不明的展馆投掷燃烧瓶了哦!”WWWW ”

If you are not raising your flag I’m throwing Molotor cocktail bombs to this nationality-unidentified pavilion. WWWW

“实际情况应该是这样的吧
中国:为什么日本馆不升国旗?
日本:为了照顾中国的反日情绪…
中国:哎?
日本:哎? ”

The real conversation should be like this:
China: Why don’t you raise your flag in front of the pavilion?
Japan: We want to give consideration to antt-Japanese sentiment in China.
China: What?
Japan: What?

 ExpoShanghai43

Book the Expo 2010 Shanghai Tour 6 days at a discount price (only $556 including hotel) from our partner China Highlight now!

Get a quote and customize your Expo 2010 tour for your Shanghai Expo trip!

See all cheap travel packages to China.

36 Comments | Leave a comment | Comment feed

  1. Tony Neville says:

    “Television programs with Sino-Japanese War themes are frequently broadcasted in China, many people think the sun flag is a symbol of militarism.”

    Actually, I saw a bit of one last night on the ChineseTV channel broadcast here in New Zealand. It was screened in the “Chinese Cinema” time-slot. Some clownish, bowlegged Japanese soldier with the facial expression of someone who’s just swallowed a lemon gets outwitted by two artful Chinese children. I could not understands what anyone was saying, but it just looked moronic which is why I gave it only a minute’s worth of my time.

    • Wang Er says:

      《小兵张嘎》?That’s a classic movie!

    • AsiansWearFur says:

      The comment about the sun flag raises a good point, because the WWII axis powers of Japan and Germany were equally notorious for their military adventures, but Japan post WWII has maintained its wartime national flag, which is an obvious symbol with attachment to imperialist Japan aggression of WWII/War of Resistance.

      It’d be reasonable to speculate the overreaction of certain people should the Nazi-era flag be still flying on soil of a nation for which they still antagonize with geopolitical manipulations and revisionist history, in the case of China: Diaoyutai Islands and Rape of Nanking.

  2. Dr. K says:

    To the rest of the world, it’s called “World War II”.

    To China, it’s called “The War of Japanese Aggression”.

    Tony, think of the movie as the Chinese version of the 1960’s US TV show “Hogans Heroes”. Then it makes perfect sense.

    • Tony Neville says:

      Yes, it makes perfect sense.

      ‘To China, it’s called “The War of Japanese Aggression”’.

      Does someone in China really not see that the Japanese haven’t been murdering, torturing, maiming and enslaving Chinese people for over sixty years? It is an enterprise that has long since been taken up by the CCP, and the CCP has excelled at it. One would have thought the War of Communist Party Aggression would have left a much deeper scar in the memories of Chinese citizens.

  3. GuoBao says:

    The thing is that even though the government here (mostly silently) nurtures the anti-Japanese sentiments for the sake of the age old Us-vs-Them theme to bolster unity the younger generations today mostly are pretty interested in and thinks favourably about Japan. Modern Japanese cultural influence is pretty strong here now and usually when I do the “Which country would you like to visit?”-routine in my older classes more than half usually answer “I would like to visit Japan”. I think Japan should have kept the flag up since politics should be kept away from a thing like the Expo and I am pretty sure that a majority of the Chinese wouldn’t think it is problematic to show the flag at their fancy exhibition. I would also assume that Shanghairen are more internationally minded and less nationalistic than most Chinese in general hence would be more relaxed towards the Japanese.

    • AlleyCat says:

      Sometimes it’s the minority that raises our awareness. Perhaps they felt they had more to gain by avoiding a symbol that might trigger a misplaced sence of nationalism.
      Just like you wouldn’t like to wear your favorite red shirt when confronting a bull.

      It is called “diplomacy”.

  4. John says:

    Time to move on, folks. It’s 2010. Wallowing in the past won’t help anyone.

    Time to get over it and move on.

    • voiceofhomer says:

      Easy for you to say, you may be a Japanese bastard son and not know it.

      The Japanese army was the mother rapers, father muggers and children killers in China and around many Asian countries.

      So if they raped your mama and killed your father and sister let’s see how well you will take it.

      It’s 2012, you get over it bitch.

      • Tony Neville says:

        You may be the bastard son of Mao Zedong, but I would never place any blame on you for the millions of people that workshy blackhearted narcissistic piece of authoritarian garbage sent to an early grave. Why? Because guilt is not transferable. I couldn’t care less if you found an old Japanese war criminal and slaughtered him. It would be cause for celebration. But if, hypothetically, I saw you commit some dastardly deed against a Japanese because of what his or her Grandparents or great Grandparents might have done during WW2, I’d rip your face off and piss in your eye sockets. Fair is fair.

  5. Panda says:

    Japan to China is what the Nazi’s are to European and US, in media. Notice I didn’t say Germany? There is still a long ways before Japan and China have friendlier relations to each other.

    • Joe says:

      Actually, to be more specific and for others to understand better. It should be: The Japanese to the Chinese are like the Nazis to the Jews. Chinese weren’t seen as humans by the Japanese and were killed without any remorse.

      • GuoBao says:

        Actually, way to go not getting Panda’s point. And a golf clap for being Captain Obvious as well.

  6. Crystal says:

    Like most Chinese, I find it difficult to sympathize to Japanese.
    However, I don’t like the fact that they humiliate themselves by not raising their national flag. In my opinion – too much of humility and modesty is a symptom of “repressed” arrogance and aggression which can easily burst out in certain circumstances.
    More balance, more balance, please…

  7. Wang Er says:

    The anti-Japanese sentiment in China has been exaggerated and the Japanese government (or whatever company that manages the Japanese Pavilion) is just too sensitive. Beijing Olympics and many other sports events had Japanese flags raised and I haven’t heard a single incident that fenqings tried to pull them down, since mistreat to a guest would be a slap to host’s own face in Chinese thinking.

    BTW, Key, you should translate some Chinese comments in the Chinese site. Let me select some representative comments for you.

    “是日本自己的问题.中国人没那么敏感.你们太小看中国民众的包容力和成熟度了”

    It’s Japan’s own problem. Chinese people are not that sensitive. You underestimate Chinese people’s tolerance and maturity.

    “其实这是对主办国的不尊重… ”

    [Not raising the Japanese flag] is actually disrespectful to the host country.

    “他们不升国旗,国内的工作人员都不来问的么?只有日本不升国旗确实很怪吧= = ”

    They didn’t raise their flag but why Chinese staff didn’t ask them reason? Isn’t it strange that only Japan did such thing?”

    “我一开始还以为日本忘记升旗了呢 = = ”

    I thought Japan forgot raising its flag.

    “我很费解”

    I’m confused.

    ” 真怕反日的话,干嘛要建造日本馆?
    反过来既然已经大张旗鼓的开放了,为啥还要做这么弱智的行为。。
    话说回来,中国人压根也不会真的跑世博反日吧
    日本人到底清不清楚咱们的反日底线和这个反日的出发点是啥?
    大学生都跑去当志愿者了,哪有空去反日啊。。。 ”

    If they are really afraid of anti-Japan sentiment, why build the Japanese Pavilion in the first place? Since they have already opened the Pavilion on a grand scale, then why did they do such silly thing [not raising national flag]? By the way, Chinese people wouldn’t go to the Expo to protest Japan. Japanese don’t get our baseline and origin in anti-Japanese sentiment. College students all went to become Expo volunteers so who has time to protest …

    “韩国说自己场馆最受欢迎虽然比较蠢,但勉强还能接受…至于日本这个就……真是蠢翻了. ”

    Korea said their Pavilion is the most popular, which is silly but could still be acceptable …. as for Japan’s [not raising flag] … is so stupid.

    ” 其实这并不关我们事啊,怎么拿我们开涮了 ”

    This incident is not our business, so don’t make us involved.

    “非常奇怪。扬日本国旗正常。这是国际展览会。有中国人反对的话,这是中国方面的问题。
    可是我也了解,关于日本,什么事情会成为反日的借口的。
    比如说,在中国的日本企业,午饭不那么好的话,就有中国人说,日本人瞧不起中国人,或因为日本的历史原因,日本企业对中国人的待遇特别好。
    还有,在商业上的谈判,日本的东西贵的话或发现问题的话,中国方面就说日本人瞧不起中国,或提起历史问题或反日情绪,让日方受对不起的感觉,让日方让步。
    我们经常听说过上面第二个故事。韩国也是一样。”

    Very weird. Raising Japanese flag is normal since it’s an international exhibition. If any Chinese person is against it, it’s China’s problem. However, I understand what’s could be used as excuses to protest Japan. For example, if Japanese company’s China branch has lower standard in food in lunch, there would be Chinese people to say Japanese people look down upon us and they would further relate it to historical reasons, so Japanese companies in China treat Chinese employees pretty well. And more, if Japanese products have issues or are too expensive, some Chinese would use that part of history as a chip in bargaining and force the Japanese side to compromise. We heard the second story a lot. Korean are doing the same thing to Japan too.

    ” 军旗和国旗是两回事吧,无语升个国旗有什么问题的囧 ”

    [Japan’s] army flag and it’s national flag are two different things, what’s the problem of raising the national flag? I’m speechless.

    “世博跟政治无关,堂堂正正升起你们的国旗吧。
    天朝去日本做什么自然也会骄傲的升起五星红旗,这是民族的荣耀。 ”

    Expo should be unrelated to politics, so raise your flag proudly. We will do the same and raise our flag proudly when doing anything in Japan. This is about national prestige.

    ” “你们再不升国旗我们就要向这个所属不明的展馆投掷燃烧瓶了哦!”WWWW ”

    If you are not raising your flag I’m throwing Molotor cocktail bombs to this nationality-unidentified pavilion. WWWW

    “实际情况应该是这样的吧
    中国:为什么日本馆不升国旗?
    日本:为了照顾中国的反日情绪…
    中国:哎?
    日本:哎? ”

    The real conversation should be like this:
    China: Why don’t you raise your flag in front of the pavilion?
    Japan: We want to give consideration to antt-Japanese sentiment in China.
    China: What?
    Japan: What?

  8. huzhang says:

    Complete overreaction, I don’t think most Chinese would care as long as it the Hinomaru and not the imperial Rising Sun flag. Acts like this only lead to further stereotyped Western misinterpretations that split Asians apart, as can be evidenced by some of the comments here.

  9. Kai Pan says:

    to: Tony

    You don’t understand that the Japanese will always be enemies to the Chinese. We will not forget what they did to us.

    Chinese are a peaceful, loving people. We did not invade Japan or humiliate their women.

    We may be irrational, and foolish in the eyes of the world for not moving on but we don’t mind being irrational. Americans still hate Japanese. That is why they have over a 100,000 soldiers still in Japan.

    • Mike Fish says:

      Is someone impersonating Kai?

    • Key says:

      haha Yeah, this is not the real Kai for sure, I now how Kai speaks… lol

    • Tony Neville says:

      Nobody is going to forget what the Japanese of WW2 did to the Chinese, Pacific Islanders and to Australian/New Zealand/American POWs. The documentary evidence is vast and is there for anyone who wants to know. But the Japanese people of today are nothing like the Japanese people of WW2, and ~guilt~ ~is~ ~not~ ~transferable~. People are moving on. Chinese colleagues have made mention of antagonism between Chinese and Japanese, but they themselves say they have none. You know… It is always the ~other~ guy.

      Americans don’t hate the Japanese. There are about 34,000 Americans stationed in Japan who are there for its defense in accordance with some treaty. Besides, the huge amount of investment and technical know-how Americans have poured into Japan after WWII is not characteristic of anyone that would sustain hatred against a defeated people.

      BTW, I have never thought of the Chinese people as being irrational nor foolish, at least not by dint of them being Chinese — just the ones who eagerly followed Mao and subsequent leaders at the cost of millions upon millions of lives, and also the latter day apologists for the CCP. Believe me when I say that if I did not have respect for Chinese mainlanders, I would not give your gangster government so much flak.

  10. aljensen says:

    There’s only about 33,000 US soldiers in Japan

  11. Leo says:

    Anybody minds telling the Jews it’s time getting over the Holocaust obsession and stopping their racist attitudes towards the Germans generally and Mr. Hitler in particular? Thanks.

  12. It’s quirks like this that make foreign diplomacy sooo much fun. Then again, the Japanese pavilion could an ugly money pit like the U.S. pavilion – so things could be worse:

    http://shanghaiscrap.com/?p=5093

  13. Charlotte says:

    I’m a Chinese. I definitely think we should all move on. History is for reference and reminding us of not repeating our own mistakes and others, not for revenging, grumbling, complaining or “savoring” our scars.

  14. kira says:

    Ask any Japanese who’s been in China, have they ever been resented? I don’t think so, quite the contrary most Chinese admire and appreciate Japanese’s politeness and their efficiency

    • Tony Neville says:

      Politeness and efficiency are two striking characteristics that not only Japanese but Chinese immigrants in New Zealand have a lot of. I would like many more Chinese people living here except that too many of my countrymen look upon Chinese immigration as a threat to their jobs, wages, and lifestyle, so the government has drastically stemmed the flow of Chinese immigration. Frankly, they’re a bunch of shallow know-nothing wankers when one challenges their arguments. Deep down, I think they’re just suspicious of people who look different to themselves. Attitudes are slowly changing for the better, though.

      Tony.

    • Actually I remember quite well talking to a young Japanese traveler I met in Beijing. He came wanting to learn more about Chinese culture, so he applied to study at a gongfu training center, then at a traditional music training center. He was refused at both places as soon as they figured out that he was Japanese rather than a Korean or other ethnic Asian. I doubt he’s the only one who has had such experiences as souvenirs from a trip to China. That said, other Japanese travelers may have avoided such unpleasantness, particularly if they stick to travel groups, 4-star/5-star accommodations, and avoid more in-depth interactions.

      While it’s not accurate to generalize, saying all Chinese transfer the grudge from WWII, or bear ill will towards today’s Japanese (culture or people), there are still plenty who do. There’s also a difference between admiring certain cultural characteristics, and feelings borne towards a government and/or its people. Example: the difference between how most foreigners view China’s government and how they view China’s culture and citizens. Admiration for Japanese entertainment products or technology doesn’t necessarily translate into understanding or good will towards the Japanese people.

      It’s certainly fair for Chinese to continue to be suspicious of certain governmental acts (textbook revisionism, Yasukuni shrine, etc.) that bear on sensitive historical issues, but as long as race hatred is actively promulgated, perhaps Japanese companies and representatives in China are wise to step carefully to avoid setting off any powder kegs of public sentimentality.

      • kira says:

        You do make lots of sense here. Admiring doesn’t necessarily means understanding and good will towards Japan, but hey I think most Chinese that appears to “hate” Japan they just like to grumble, it’s a typical Chinese thing to demean others in a way to relieve their self-loathing or reality-loathing, and “Japanese” just seem so handy due to historical reason that it makes them feel justified, but deep down they don’t really care I think because they have better things to worry about in this country.

  15. Glorious China says:

    Fucking Japanese Pigs. Arrogant sons of bitches.

    There reason why Japanese not put flag put? Reason simple! You kill many of Chinese during war and your pig fuck Japanese government deny killings so hate for Japan is deep in Chinese blood.

    You raise flag you will anger some Chinese. Japan just worried angry chinese will burn down Japan pavillion if raise flag. All Japanese government need to do is say sorry and confess murders of thousands and thousands of Chinese in War. German do it and now no problem with Germany. It is Japan do not raise flag. It show they have fear now. They know they did bloody crime so they know not raise flag.

  16. Jack says:

    Blood debt to use for blood! Denial is an insult to China!

  17. samuel says:

    stupid, raise the flag
    60 years ago the Japanese have changed get over yourselves and forgive them.

Leave a Comment

Prove you are human! *
Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Shanghai World Expo: Japan Pavilion not raising Japanese flag to give consideration t - TheNewTopical.com - current events, politics, culture, ethics, economics discussion forum
  2. Toyota’s Violin-Playing Robot at Shanghai World Expo 2010 | My Robot Weblog
Kepard - Premium VPN Service

Latest Posts

Send or Receive Money in China

David Goldman | August 16th, 2016
bankwire

5 luxury hotels in Asia

Oliver Verot | June 2nd, 2016
ritz-bund-view-suite

Recent Comments

Is it normal to get an erection while reading such an eerie story? I feel extremely uncomfortable... And also Matthew…» more

Is it normal to get an erection while reading such an eerie story? I feel extremely uncomfortable... And also Matthew…» more

Hi! I am a 11 year old and I do not understand what the word prostitute means... Can somebody explain…» more

right everybody wants money» more

see if you have a line i will send a screenshot of that taiwanese girl to you» more

Subscribe by email

Enter your email address: