Office dating rules of an internet technology company in Guangzhou

| March 21st, 2010

The following list of dating rules are from an internet technology company in Guangzhou (from Mop):

Translated:

Rule #42: Males who have been employed for less than a year and females who have been employed for less than three months are prohibited from finding a boyfriend or girlfriend in the company.

Rule #43: Female employees who have found a boyfriend outside the company and have decided to have relations with him must take the initiative to tell their superior. Only if the relationship is fitting for the company can she continue to be employed, and those who fail to report are directly expelled.

Rule #44: Male employees under 25 are restricted from finding a girlfriend in the company.

Rule #45: Employees with monthly salaries above 15,000 RMB do not have to follow the above three rules.

Rule #46: Frequently changing boyfriends and girlfriends within the company is prohibited, those who have changed more than three times will be permanently expelled.

(Note: straddle two boats – Having 2 boyfriend or girlfriend at the same time counts as 2 times)

15 Comments | Leave a comment | Comment feed

  1. Mike G. says:

    Like in nature, the older lions try all they can to keep the younger lions irrelevant in the mating game. It looks like things are no different at this company.

  2. GuoBao says:

    It’s a gross interference in the individual’s rights. Oh,, it’s in China?! Nevermind then. I love the More than 15.000 a month rule btw,, what an absolutely hypocritical rule.

  3. moo says:

    lol @ last rule – they just got to keep some of the pipes “clean” enough for the old plumbers. sounds like some rampant sexual music chairs going on – who needs year end bonuses for all the lays?

  4. Richard says:

    This is so retarded. Weird enough to try to control these situations, but only in China do you have such an explicit dialogue about these issues anyway. It’s just assumed that age, income, education and even things like height and weight should all be part of some equation.

    • Carl says:

      That sounds “a bit” prejudicial now doesn’t it? Go (re-)read your [filling-your-ethnicity] history textbook.

      • Richard says:

        Well it’s true, I never met any Chinese people who didn’t ask these kind of questions when talking about a third person’s relationship… or even just about a third person. People pretty much think the same way in the west, just in China they say it without any kind of controversy or taboo and it seems to me, more meticulously. It’s refreshing to get these things out sometimes, but can be irritating when the details end up larger than the point I was trying to make. It can get especially on one’s nerves if they are always doing this kind of analysis on e.g. your wife/girlfriend.

        Just something fixed into their culture, like when I see an apartment which is nicer than another apartment but with less square meters, it’s hard for me to explain it to Chinese people. I had never even noticed the no. of square meters when I was renting in UK. Well, maybe it’s a negative stereotype, but I didn’t get it from any textbook.

        • Carl says:

          no dough these rules are beyond ridiculousness. I mean, how are you going to enforce that, is it even moral? would your employees follow or just bust it? It’s absurd, while i completely disagree with such company rules, i can see why it is in place, even if i disagree with it.

          And, another note, this looks very fake to me. Who in the right mind would impose this on a twenty first century workforce?! it sounds like some late Maoist era shit, looks fake.

          Back to what you were saying, yes, i agrees with your points, my fault for being not sober and resort to typical generalization used for anything even slightly anti-Chinese even if it really isn’t. for that I apologize.

  5. Laoshi says:

    Chinese stupidity for you…

  6. Jing says:

    a bit of the self-introduction before I make my points across. I grew up in China and I’m still living in China. the real authentic Chinese points from a native are

    1. MOP is an entertaining website, it’s for entertainment purpose only,in another word, you read it for fun ’cause it exaggerates things in a way or another.

    2.that is the current climate of the society and trust me is not easy to strive and thrive in fierce competition with limited sources, thus we tend to use rulers to measure everything see if they are compatible or not. And many times love happens because that two people in love just click right off, I believe there are many people being meticulous and there are not and all you need to do is to get used to it, no matter you contribute to its culture or whatever. Just like I can never feel comfortable or at ease faced with the topic of sex in public

  7. kira says:

    true, forums like mop, tianya, are like enormous hodgepodges, i never understand how they absorb so many fans

    • Wang Er says:

      Kinda true for a lot forums in China. But they have entertainment value like TV and movies – you keep receiving bizarre and mind-blowing bits while not worrying about their authenticity – solar neutrino wouldn’t boil the earth core and rocks can’t defy gravity and float in the sky, but whatever.

  8. I can somewhat see the point of rule #43, despite it being perhaps the most eggregious attempt to invade and dictate the private lives of employees. If the boyfriend is at a rival company, the power he is assumed to have over his girlfriend could put her in a compromising situation with company secrets. But note the bizarre gender inequality of the rule and assumption: that the male partner asserts influence over the female to give up company secrets/assets, but that a female partner from outside couldn’t assert influence or ‘seduce’ the same company info/assets.

    Bizarre. But I don’t find it that hard to believe that a Chinese company would enact such rules. Do the rules conflict with any Chinese laws restricting powers companies have over their employees? If there are any applicable Chinese laws restricting companies’ powers,
    what is the chance that they will actually be applied to penalize the company? Are there any non-governmental institutions in China that would protest these rules (generate bad PR for the company) over either invasion of privacy or gender-inequality? Furthermore, the scarcity of jobs-to-applicants means that companies have additional leverage over their employees when it comes to getting them to put up with such draconian strictures. This last factor may be the most important: In China, as elsewhere, employees will put up with utter hell if the reward is good enough and the job positions scarce enough–look at medical residents and law associates at prestigious hospitals/firms; they also have a bit of a moratorium on their love lives… just not dictated in such specific rules.

  9. dentrite says:

    Rule #42 – discrimination against new employee
    Rule #43 – discrimination against female employee
    Rule #44 – discrimination against adult male employee
    Rule #45 – a cunning and self-explained plan of the horny boss
    Rule #46 – discrimination against the freedom of love

  10. commomer says:

    RULE 45 kicks ass lol

    what a vip exception because you earn more lol hence the decider of the rule earns just above that amount I bet

  11. Hey can someone point a good website about How find the perfect dating partner?~~:

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